Friday, May 31, 2013

Needful Things from Lehman's

What would you need in a Homesteading situation?  This is a question I asked myself recently.  Hunky Hubby and I have been collecting stuff for about 32 years now.  When I think of all the "stuff" we have, I seriously doubt that most of it would be useful if we were forced into a homesteading way of life.

Today, I would like to point out a few things that we could use in the event that we have to return to the off grid, simplistic lifestyle of our forefathers.  All of the items below were picked randomly from a search I did on www.lehmans.com for clearance items.  They are all for sale and are priced reasonably.  I do not have a personal relationship with this vendors. I do not profit from this post.

One-man Fence Stretcher


One-man Fence Stretcher
Heavy-duty stretcher holds wire in place so your hands are free to make the repairs. Move the traveling hook to where you need it (against post or wire). Stationary hook brings up the slack.
  • Use for splicing and stretching fence wiring
  • Ideal for high-tensile, barbed and smooth wire 
  • $59.95



  • Works at any depth
  • Special leak-proof valve opens to fill then closes automatically when bucket is drawn up
  • Use for emergencies or temporary installations
  • Not intended for everyday use
  • Galvanized steel with watertight, crimped seams
  • Reinforced with 16-gauge crossbar and extra-strong bottom
  • You may have to remove any installed submersible pump before using a well bucket
  • Holds 1.9 gallons
  • Fits wells down to 4"ID
  • 2" welded ring for rope
  • 3-1/2"ODx52"L
  • 4 lb.
  • Locally made by the Amish.
$69.95

                                  


Lehman's Own Butter Churn
Based on the “Dazey” churn from the past, we’ve improved our churn for better quality and performance. Now it’s more durable with stainless steel, rust-resistant paddle and lid. Plus, with long-lasting, self-lubricating gears, churning butter is easier and much faster.
  • Bigger, square glass jar holds 5 quarts, churns approx. 3 qt.
  • 16-1⁄4"H, 5"OD opening, 6 lb.
  • Assembled in the USA with domestic and imported parts.
  • Includes FREE Making Cheese, Butter and Yogurt booklet with tips and recipes.
$149.95

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Friday, May 24, 2013

Needful Things on Etsy



What would you need in a Homesteading situation?  This is a question I asked myself recently.  Hunky Hubby and I have been collecting stuff for about 32 years now.  When I think of all the "stuff" we have, I seriously doubt that most of it would be useful if we were forced into a homesteading way of life.

Today, I would like to point out a few things that we could use in the event that we have to return to the off grid, simplistic lifestyle of our forefathers.  All of the items below were picked randomly from a search I did on www.etsy.com for clearance items.  They are all for sale and are priced reasonably.  I do not have a personal relationship with any of these vendors.

 Gardening will be a must!

CLEARANCE - Garden Markers, Hand Crafted From Reclaimed Cedar
$1.75

 
MiscKDesigns

Twine can be used for many situations that may come up.

CLEARANCE Bakers twine 3000 yards Red and White
$29.99
terbearco 

 Cotton fabric can be used for clothing, curtains, feed sacks, pillow cases, etc.

Clearance Sale 100 Percent Cotton Fabric Print 2 Yard Bundle of 2 Prints
$12.00
 GrannyBz

Warm clothing will be required for winter months.

CLEARANCE SALE Woodland Pixie Crochet Hood
$15.38
 
linziloop 

Sturdy tools will come in handy during stressful times.
CLEARANCE SALE - Vintage Tin Snips
$9.00

HousingAuthority

Thursday, May 23, 2013

A New Twist on an Old Recipe

Snicker-doodle Muffins

When I saw this recipe, I knew I was going to run to the cabin kitchen and make them right up.  Snicker-doodles are one of my favorite cookies and I love to make them.

 The original recipe called for 2 sticks of butter.  I didn't have that much butter on hand.  I substituted 1 cup of shortening.  They turned out just fine, although I know the butter would make them absolutely divine.  

Hunky Hubby came home to a house smelling of cinnamon.  He was a happy hubby.

The Ingredients



The Finished Product


The Recipe

Snickerdoodle Muffins
slightly modified from http://www.eatmedelicious.com/2007/12/snickerdoodle-muffins.html
 

1 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 eggs
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp cream of tartar
3/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1 1/4 cup sour cream
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour

1/2 cup sugar and 1 TBSP cinnamon mixed together for rolling*

1.Cream the butter and sugar until soft about 3 to 5 minutes. Add in the vanilla. Add in the eggs one at a time and mix until each is incorporated.

2.In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar and nutmeg.

3.Add the flour mixture and the sour cream alternately to the egg-butter mixture in the additions. Start with the flour and end with the flour. Scrape the bowl occasionally.

4. Using an ice cream scoop, scoop out muffin batter one at a time and drop into a shallow bowl filled with the cinnamon sugar mixture. Roll the muffin around in the mixture until it is covered completely in cinnamon sugar. Place muffin into muffin tin. Depending on the size of your tins, you should get about 12 to 14 muffins. Bake them for approx. 20-22 minutes in a 350F oven or until they are golden brown.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

All Snuggled Up For Summer

Welcome to the Taj-Magardenhal!

I told Handy Hubby that we really should build a tunnel over the outside raise bed.  We need to be able to extend our short growing season.  I was thinking something like this.......


Handy Hubbie was thinking something like this....




Turns out we think outside an entirely different box.  Either way, it works!

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

The First Zucchini Seed

In Wyoming, just about all we can grow is Zucchini!

We planted the first of the zucchini in the greenhouse today.  Remember that we live at 6200 feet so we still have three weeks until we can take them outside.  They may even be nights where we have to place a heater in the greenhouse.

The herbs are all planted and we will start selling them as soon as they can produce enough to share.  I plan on sharing half of the herb harvest and dry the rest.  They come in handy in the winter months when food starts tasting bland.  They always give a nice favor when they are homegrown and dried fresh.

The gardens give me renewed strength and are always good for having something great to look forward to.

Thursday, May 16, 2013